Seymour Civil Engineering celebrates run-away success at this years’ CECA North East Awards

Seymour Civil Engineering walked away triumphant, after winning four out of the five awards at this year’s prestigious North East Civil Engineering Contractors Association ceremony.

Award wins included Health and Safety Company of the Year and Training Company of the Year, as well as top honours for a project carried out in the company’s home town of Hartlepool.

The Project of the Year trophy was awarded to Seymour for its restoration of the Hartlepool Town Wall, in partnership with Hartlepool Council and The Environment Agency, a Grade 1 Listed structure which had been identified as having overtopping rates that posed a threat to public safety as well as a number properties being at risk from flooding.

Many properties in close proximity of the 14th century wall were at one time uninsurable. The flood defence improvement is now planned to provide up to 100 years’ protection and these properties now have the benefit of being able to gain valuable buildings insurance.

The company gained it’s second award for “going the extra mile” on the Hartlepool Town Wall project by opening up coastal frontage, improving access for pedestrians and blending seamlessly the original seawall and new setback wall. This award recognised the early contractor involvement and how Seymour went the extra mile where partnership working with Hartlepool Borough Council was key to the schemes success. The award also recognised the many community initiatives undertaken during the works including Christmas Tree planting, adapting programme of works to accommodate local community events and ‘wear it pink’ in aid of Cancer Research.

Seymour was, further awarded highly commended for its work on another flood alleviation scheme in partnership with Northumbrian Water, in the Brunton Park suburb of Newcastle, long a problem area due to surface and foul water interacting with the Ouseburn tributary of the Tyne.

Seymour completed its prizewinning sweep by winning both Health and Safety Company of the Year and Training Company of the Year.

Kevin Byrne, Managing Director of Seymour Civil Engineering, said: “It is with great satisfaction that we have been recognised as first in class in all the categories that we entered at this year’s CECA North East awards. The achievement is a culmination of years of hard work and professionalism. While we have won in each category previously we have never taken a clean sweep, full credit to the dedicated team at Seymour.”

The firm has recently started work on a £3.4 million regeneration of Church Street and Church Square in Hartlepool, working in partnership with Hartlepool Borough Council, The Tees Valley Combined Authority, The Heritage Lottery Fund, and Re-form Landscape.

Seymour Civil Engineering-sponsored Team Hartlepool celebrate success at the Bangkok International Rugby Sevens tournament

Team Hartlepool celebrate their success in this year’s Bangkok International Rugby Sevens

“A great success for Hartlepool rugby and the town.”

So said team manager John Bickerstaff after Seymour Civil Engineering-sponsored Hartlepool won the Shield final at the Bangkok International Rugby Sevens.

The town side, made up of players from five Hartlepool & District clubs, plus two guests from the management’s link up with Hong Kong rugby, beat Lao Nagas 19-5 to clinch silverware.

But John explained that the measure of success went beyond being able to hold a trophy aloft at the Patana International School in the Thai capital.

“Hartlepool came out to compete in a brilliant competition and we’ve come away with something,” he said.

“That’s what we intended to do and I’m thrilled that we did that.

“We were making a step into the unknown really in terms of the standard we were coming up against.

“Many of the teams here were either national sides or teams who play together all the time.

“And you had the Pacific Warriors who had two former All Blacks playing for them.

“Our lads played very well, which is testament to them as players, we had limited sevens experience and had never played together before as a side.

“We were also contending with the heat and humidity, something nearly all the other teams were accustomed to

“But credit to the players for the way they performed.

“With the exception of the second group game, against the Thailand Development side, we were in with a chance of winning every match.

“Hartlepool has come out to Bangkok and performed on the international field and it’s something the town can be proud of.

“It’s much more than that, the name Hartlepool is out there and in a good light, and that’s down to our sponsors, people like Seymours Civil Enginnering.

“They have backed not just us as a squad but Hartlepool itself on the international stage.”

Hartlepool opened and closed the competition with victories against Lao Nagas, the Laos national sqaud.

The last win saw the squad at their best, contending not only with intense heat and humidity but vibrant opponents, to take the Shield, 19-5.

Hartlepool conceded a first-half unconverted try but responded magnificently.

The town side’s leading tournament scorer set them on their way, Jack McCallum breaking from half-way to score under the posts with a scintillating burst.

Cameron Lithgo converted for a 7-5 lead and it was soon 14-5 as Liam Austwicke went over from close range with Lithgo again adding the extras.

There was more to come as McCallum, Alex Rochester and Adam Smith all combined before Bailey finished in the corner.

Hartlepool had finished day one third in Group A

After a 15-14 victory over Lao Nagas in the opening fixture, they were defeated 24-7 by All for One (Thailand’s national development team), before losing 12-0 in the decider for second place, to Kazakh side, Olymp.

In the knock-out phase, they conceded two very late tries to lose to Spanish side Wiss, 24-14, before an agonising 21-19 loss to Chulalongkorn University, when Liam Austwicke’s conversion attempt with the last kick of the game went narrowly wide.

However, Hartlepool finished on a high with that Shield success over Lao.

Image courtesy of Paul Lincoln

Image courtesy of Paul Lincoln

Seymour Civil Engineering celebrates continued growth with the appointment of board of directors

front left Adam Harker, back left Karl Brennan, centre Kevin Byrne, back right Simon Rodgers, and front right Stuart Dickens

Seymour Civil Engineering has taken further steps towards securing its future success, with the appointment of four new company directors.

 

All hailing from existing roles within the company, Adam Harker has been named as Contracts Director, Simon Rodgers as Commercial Director, Stuart Dickens as Construction Director and Karl Brennan as Pre-construction Director.

 

Karl, who has been with Seymour Civil Engineering for 13 years, previously as the company’s bid coordinator, said: “I’m delighted to have been appointed in this new position. It’s fantastic to have been rewarded for my commitment to the business. It’s also testament to one of Seymour’s key values, ‘A People Business’. Seymour is excellent at fostering an environment that provides opportunity.

 

“A major part of my new position as pre-construction director will be looking at how Seymour engages with clients and stakeholders and how those relationships develop throughout the lifecycle of a project.

 

“Seymour has always been a client focused contractor, and as a result will have been successfully trading for 40 years next year, but placing a continued importance on maintaining strong relationships, and promoting sustainable outcomes above short term gains, significantly contributes to a positive and robust future for the company.”

 

Adam added: “I feel honoured and privileged to be promoted to director. It’s coming up to 10 years that I have been with the company and throughout that time the firm has assisted me to develop and grow. It’s now my turn to help take the business forward.

 

“I see the appointment of a board of directors as a real statement of intent by our Managing Director Kevin Byrne. It shows his drive and determination to see Seymour grow and continue to establish itself as the leading multi-discipline civil engineering company in the North East. With the new directors in place I can only see the business going from strength to strength in the coming years.”

 

Speaking about the latest appointments, Managing Director Kevin Byrne, said:  “As Seymour approaches its 40th anniversary I felt this was the perfect time to undertake the re-structure and introduce the board of directors to assist with making the vision we have for the company a reality.

 

“I will be working closely with the new directors to identify both strengths and challenges within the business, allowing us to prioritise time and focus attention on the key areas.

 

“As a team I am confident we will be able to lay the foundations for Seymour’s sustainable and structured growth going forward.”

 

Based at Seymour House on Hartlepool Marina, Seymour Civil Engineering has enjoyed a successful year, securing and completing a number of major projects across the region.

 

Most recently the firm celebrated a landmark contract win securing civil and infrastructure work for the £18 million exhibition development at Beamish Museum.

 

The firm has recently started work on the £3.4 million regeneration of Church Street and Church Square in Hartlepool, working in partnership with Hartlepool Borough Council, The Tees Valley Combined Authority, The Heritage Lottery Fund, and Re-form Landscape.

 

Securing the future whilst remembering the past Seymour Civil Engineering helps Stanley remember its war time history

Mick Mair from Seymour Civil Engineering with Adrian Cantle-Jones from Durham County Council, representatives from The Environment Agency, The River Wears Trust, The Heritage Lottery Fund, Stanley Town Council, and local residents.

North East Civil Engineering company, Seymour Civil Engineering, has completed work on a town regeneration project that captures the history of its residents.

 

Due to issues with flooding across the South Moor Terraces in Stanley, Seymour Civil Engineering was called upon to install a sustainable urban drainage system, a natural approach to managing drainage and recycling water.

 

To do this, rain garden planters were fitted between the pavement, providing homes for five trees, each commemorating one year of fighting in the First World War.

 

Along with additional foliage, the trees, positioned along the length of Pine Street, act as markers within the Twizell Heritage Trail, a route which tells the story of South Moor’s origins shortly before the First World War and how the miners shaped the community. Each tree will be marked with a World War one battle insignia, remembering the hundreds of miners who lost their lives.

The project was funded by The Heritage Lottery Fund, Durham County Council, Stanley Town Council and The Environment Agency.

 

Keith Love, Site Manager at Seymour Civil Engineering, said: “As a company, we are really proud to have been a part of a project that has not only contributed to environmental improvement and flood alleviation, but has commemorated Stanley’s heritage.

 

“Seymour Civil Engineering does everything it can to make sure it builds positive relationships with the communities affected by the projects it undertakes.”

 

Before starting on the Pine Street project, the Seymour Civil Engineering team attended a meeting with the residents to discuss the up and coming work.

 

Keith added: “Through the community meeting, we established the importance of avoiding unnecessary road closures and ensuring 24-hour accessibility to the households of vulnerable and elderly residents. Without that meeting, we would have been none the wiser and the project would have likely caused a lot of problems and upset.”

 

The project also saw Seymour Civil Engineering refurbish the pathways with block paving, designed in the style of old fashioned film reel to commemorate the important role that local cinemas played in war time communications.

 

During both World Wars, the community surrounding Stanley depended upon the five cinemas in the area for updates from the frontline.

 

Seymour Civil Engineering is renowned for its commitment to giving back to the communities within which it works and the Pine Street project was no exception.

 

Keith added: “Seymour Civil Engineering is passionate about going above and beyond to ensure its presence is considered a benefit, and its work is well received.

 

“Just one example of this is the work we did at the Stanley Community Centre. Mid way through the project we were approached by the centre’s management committee, asking if we could help make the facilities more accessible to the large numbers of elderly residents who use it. We offered to install dropped kerbs around the site, as it was clear that the community centre was an important part of community life, as anything we could do to help out was no trouble.”

 

“It’s brilliant to know that we’re making a real difference to people’s lives. The adjustments we made to our schedule and the extra work we added, had no effect on the completion of the project, but the positive impact it had on the community was ten-fold.”

 

Adrian Cantle-Jones, the Durham County Council Project Manager, said: “South Moor residents are delighted with the wonderful improvements to Pine Street and the wider Twizzel Burn and South Moor Heritage Trail. The South Moor Partnership is looking forward to continuing the regeneration of the South Moor Terraces and Twizzel Burn Catchment”.

 

The Pine Street project is one of a number of community initiatives that Seymour Civil Engineering has completed. Starting this Autumn, the firm has been contracted to carry out the civil and infrastructure work for the Remaking Beamish project, an £18 million development at Beamish museum that will see the addition of more than 30 new exhibits including a 1950’s town.

Seymour Civil Engineering starts work on £3.4m Church Street and Square regeneration project in Hartlepool

from left, Councillor Christopher Akers-Belcher, Leader of the Council, Niall Hammond, Heritage lottery Fund, Councillor Kevin Cranney, Alison Finch, Re-Form Landscape Architecture, Kevin Byrne, MD Seymour Civil Engineering, and Tess Valley Mayor, Ben Houchen

Seymour Civil Engineering has been named as the lead contractor for a Hartlepool Borough Council regeneration project which will breathe new life into Church Square and Church Street.

The regeneration project is part of plans to transform the area into a hub for creative industries. The project has been funded by the Tees Valley Combined Authority, the Heritage Lottery Fund and Hartlepool Borough Council.

The project will see Church Square given a major uplift, with the pedestrianisation of the area. A large oval event space will also be created, encircled by trees and raised seating in front of Hartlepool Art Gallery.

In Church Street, work will focus on making the street more open and widening the pavement along the south of the street to accommodate the larger numbers of people walking to and from the new Cleveland College of Art and Design campus at the bottom of the street. Engraved stones will also be set into the pavement outside key buildings, explaining their history.

Kevin Byrne, Managing Director of Seymour Civil Engineering said: “The project shows both vision and ambition. The development of the historic commercial centre into a centre

for the creative arts is refreshing. It breathes new life and energy into an area originally built be the far-sighted industrialists of the late 19th and 20th centuries

“By careful choice of materials the finished scheme will be aesthetically pleasing and durable.

“Seymour are extremely pleased to be delivering the construction phase of this scheme as it allows us to be part of the regeneration of central Hartlepool and deliver a quality product.

“These are exciting times and it’s great to be in at the start. By coincidence the current completion date falls at the 40th anniversary of the founding of Seymour Civil Engineering.”

Councillor Kevin Cranney, Chair of the Council’s Regeneration Services Ccommittee, said: “These much-needed improvements will enhance and celebrate this historic quarter of Hartlepool, creating an attractive and revitalised environment for people to enjoy and in which businesses can flourish.

As a leading North East civil engineering firm, Seymour have carried out a number of urban renewal projects in the region. Most recently the firm celebrated a landmark contract win securing civil and infrastructure work for the £18 million exhibition development at Beamish Museum.

Artist’s impression of how Church Square will look

Making history, Seymour Civil Engineering starts work on £18million expansion of Beamish Museum

Karl Brennan and Kevin Byrne at the Remaking Beamish groundbreaking ceremony

Seymour Civil Engineering has been contracted to carry out the civil and infrastructure work for the £18million expansion of Beamish, The Living Museum of the North – the biggest project in the museum’s history.

The project will see the addition of over 30 new exhibits, including a 1950s Town, Farm and a Georgian coaching inn, where visitors can stay overnight at Beamish.

Kevin Byrne, Managing Director of Seymour Civil Engineering, said: “Seymour Civil Engineering is extremely proud to be working on the next phase of the Beamish Museum development. The museum is a regional treasure and a living legacy to the history of the North East, and it’s fantastic that we’re able to support with its continued growth that will allow future generations to experience the region’s heritage for years to come.

“As an experienced contractor having worked on several historic structures and establishments, we understand the importance of projects like this and feel very passionate about using our expertise and skills to showcase the region’s incredible history.”

Thanks to the money raised by National Lottery players, the project has been awarded £10.9million by the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF).

Richard Evans, Beamish’s Director, said: “After years of careful planning we are really excited to be starting this major project, creating new ways for visitors to experience Beamish and learn more about everyday life in the North East of England through time.

“This is the largest project we have ever undertaken – so this is a major milestone in the history of Beamish. We are looking forward to the future with great optimism as we continue to grow and attract even more visitors to our region.”

Remaking Beamish project is expected to create nearly 100 new jobs, and training opportunities, including 50 apprenticeships. An extra 100,000 tourists are set to be attracted to the region. The museum will remain open throughout the building programme.

Find out more about the Remaking Beamish project at www.beamish.org.uk.

Apprentices lead the way in inspiring the future of engineering

from left, Luke Bell, Sam Shaw and Klaudia Robinson

Apprentices from Seymour Civil Engineering, one of the North East’s leading civil contractors have spoken out about the importance of the apprenticeship route at the Bring It On North East event.

The exhibition, which was held at Sunderland’s Stadium of Light, targeted the engineers of the future and saw three apprentices from Seymour, Luke Bell, Sam Shaw, and Klaudia Robinson, inspiring youngsters and helping children from schools across the North East have a go on the Institute of Civil Engineers’ Bridge.

The event falls in line with research conducted by Engineering UK, revealing that companies need to recruit 56,000 engineers a year until 2022 to meet demand and currently there is an annual shortfall of 28,000 apprentices entering into the industry.

Klaudia, said: “It’s incredibly important to raise the aspirations of young people and to inform them of the options available to them. It gives them more to aim for and the more education we can give them surrounding careers in engineering then the better it is for the industry and the region.

“It’s especially important to remove the misconceptions that engineering is strictly a male career choice. I’ve seen the girls here at the event take just as much, if not more, interest in what he had to say and they have actively got involved with helping to erect the bridge.”

Sam said: “There have been so many school kids coming up to me and asking me questions about the bridge and what sort of engineering is involved in creating a structure such as this. It’s incredible to see children from all sorts of backgrounds taking an active interest in it.

“Some have even been telling me facts they know about engineering. One pupil told me that they knew why the bridge was made using triangles for the struts as it’s one of the most structurally durable shapes. It’s great that our region’s school children are learning things like this in school.”

Seymour now has a total of 6 apprentices, including Ryan Browell Junior, who is an apprentice engineer working on the firms Newcastle projects.

Luke Bell who attended the event, was taken on by Seymour this year alongside fellow student Darren Coombs.

Luke said: “Seymour coming into my school and making the effort to connect with me was exactly what I needed to make the decision to apply for an apprenticeship, which is why it is so important that events like this are put on and backed by local companies.

“I believe that engineering firms should be getting in front of teenagers to educate them on what careers are available to them. Careers events like Bring It On are the perfect way to meet and chat with students, engagement that could make a real difference to their decisions for the future.”

Seymour Civil Engineering completes work on the Skelton Townscape Project

 

An initiative being undertaken by Seymour Civil Engineering in collaboration with Skelton Villages Civic Pride, Redcar & Cleveland Council and funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund has been completed in Skelton.

The project hopes to restore the town’s historical heritage and looks to improve already developed areas such as public roads and pathways, as well as public spaces in order to attract more visitors to the village.

The first visible works by Seymour began on the 30th May and included new landscaping at either end of the High Street and the area known as ‘The Hills’ as well as a mosaic to commemorate Skelton’s history being developed by local artists and school students. Part of the project will also involve the investigation of the site of a medieval settlement on the edge of Skelton.

Karl Brennan, Bid Coordinator at Seymour Civil Engineering, said: “As a local civil engineering contractor, we are delighted to be part of this scheme.

“Works were carried out to a timescale and within budget. We have engaged with local stakeholders to ensure that disruption is minimal and we will leave a legacy behind that will positively impact the local community.

“We always take a keen interest in promoting public work within towns and cities. By creating functional, aesthetic public spaces we provide a benefit to the local business and visitor economies which also contributes to the wider Tees Valley Powerhouse plan”

Councillor Bob Norton, Cabinet member for Economic Growth at Redcar & Cleveland Borough Council, said: “This is a really exciting project and I would like to pay tribute to the work that Skelton Villages Civic Pride, Seymour Civil Engineering, Skelton Parish Council, the Skelton and Gilling Estate, and the Heritage Lottery Fund have undertaken.

“Thanks also go to local councillors and our team at Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council have done an excellent job to make this vision a reality.

“Their hard work has paid off and I hope this have a positive impact on the economy of Skelton for years to come.”

The next phase of the project is due to begin in early 2018. Consultations for works to buildings began in December 2016 with the tender process beginning in the autumn. The works include shop front replacements to 32 retail properties in the town and one residential property with window replacements being undertaken for all.

VIDEO: Yorwaste’s new £3m waste transfer station

 

A new £3 million waste transfer station has been open officially opened on the outskirts of York.

The waste transfer station, built by Yorwaste at its Harewood Whin facility, will handle 75,000 tonnes of waste each year. The waste will come from households in the City of York and Selby District Council areas, as well as Yorwaste’s commercial customers in North Yorkshire.

Waste that comes into the station will be sorted and bulked by Yorwaste before being taken for final disposal at the new Allerton Waste Recovery Park (AWRP), which is due to start accepting waste in August. The waste at AWRP, which is just off the A1 at Knaresborough, will be recovered into renewable energy.

Speaking at the official opening of the transfer station, Steve Barker, Managing Director of Yorwaste, said: “With the opening of Allerton Waste Recovery Park, it was essential to have a facility nearby where waste can be sorted and bulked before it goes for final disposal and recovery.

“We are therefore delighted that the waste transfer station, which is the best of its kind in the country, has opened on schedule, just as Allerton Park becomes fully operational.

“It means our local authority and commercial customers will have access to a state-of-the-art facility which, because of its location, will provide greater value for money and help them meet their environmental responsibilities through landfill diversion and more recycling and recovery of waste.

“This facility could not have been built without the support of so many people and organisations and these include the local community, City of York Council, our architects Vincent and Gorbing and contractor Seymour Civil Engineering. We would like to thank everyone for this support.

“These are very exciting times for Yorwaste as we continue to expand and cement our position as the leading waste management company in North Yorkshire.

“The completion of the waste transfer station takes our investment to over £10 million in the last few months, after we also took over management of North Yorkshire County Council’s household waste recycling centres and acquired Todd Waste Management.”

Kevin Byrne, Managing Director of Seymour Civil Engineering, said: “The project had several constraints, including time and working alongside an operational facility, but it has been very successful and we look forward to the opportunity to work together with Yorwaste again in the future.”

The Lord Mayor of York, Councillor Barbara Boyce, pressed the button which opened the doors to the transfer station, enabling the first waste collection vehicle to enter to deposit waste.

Councillor Boyce said: “I have followed the building of this facility with interest and it’s fantastic to be part of something which will help to recycle and recover even more of York’s waste.”

Ella Foord speaks to the Student Engineer about learning on the job

Ella Foord

 

Seymour Civil Engineering is a Hartlepool-based contractor taking a pro-active approach to developing a workforce with the skills it needs to take the business forward.

The company has spoken out about the importance of working closely with degree students to combat a growing shortage of skilled workers, one of whom is being helped into her career with a mixture of classroom and on-the-job training.

She is 27-year-old Ella Foord, a Trainee Estimator who is undertaking a Quantity Surveying (Bsc) degree at Northumbria University, entering her third year in September 2017.

As The Student Engineer has found out, Ella’s many experiences include a year studying counselling, keeping the cows fed on the farm where she lives, and building the A19!

What position did you apply for when you joined Seymour aged 24?
Originally I applied for a trainee quantity surveyor position however in February 2014 the company gave me a call to invite me for another interview for a trainer estimator. I was then offered this position in June 2014.

Can you tell The Student Engineer what you were up to before you joined Seymour?
My previous position before coming to Seymour was a buyer for Eldwick Ltd, a small groundworks company based in the North Yorkshire Moors. This was my first experience within the construction industry, and I am still grateful of Eldwick Ltd for introducing me into the profession. The buyer role mainly focused on obtaining the materials and subcontractors for around seven housing sites and also a few commercial sites. I started in this position when I was 21, therefore had three years’ experience within the buying role. Within this time I learnt essential skills such as taking off drawings and gaining knowledge on what materials are needed for certain operations which helped me within the estimating role.

Three years on, what’s been the best project you’ve worked on and why?
The best project I have worked on has been the A19 improvement at the Silverlink junction in Newcastle. It was a challenging project with it being based around a very busy road junction, therefore I had to think of all the implications of each operation on the traffic surrounding the works. Part of the drainage package was looking at shaft sinking and tunnelling underneath the existing road for the new drainage, which I found fascinating as it was such a complex process.

How is your time divided between Seymour and uni? Do you find that this is a good ratio and in what ways are your university experiences helping you at Seymour?
I work at Seymour four days a week and the other day I attend university during the term times. Then I work full time when university is between terms. I do find it hard to fit in both work and university together over the winter time as I also live on a farm. Winter is our busiest time of year on the farm as the cows are confined to the sheds, therefore need to be fed up, cleaned out and given help with birthing their calves! So I do feel like I am juggling my work/life balance when it comes to winter time, but I’m sure it will all be worth the effort once I have graduated. I believe that the experiences from Seymour have helped me at university rather than the other way round, I can apply my knowledge I have gained from working at Seymour to help with my university work and provide real-life insight.

Seymour is funding your uni education. What criteria do you have to fulfil in order for them to do that
I have to pass all modules each year for Seymour to provide my fees for the next year. If I leave Seymour within two years of finishing my university course I have to pay back my fees to the company.

Have you found gender to be an issue in the workplace?
I don’t think my gender has ever been an issue as such, but I do feel that being a woman within the trade, you feel as though you have more to prove than men. Some people may still have a prejudice of women working within the engineering sector and you can sometimes feel belittled, but I would say these experiences are quite rare in this day and age. I recently attended the G4C awards where I was shortlisted for Higher Education Student of the Year in the North East. This was a massive achievement for me and to be nominated in a category where 3 out of 4 of those shortlisted were female really shows a shift in the industry. On top of this, I also noticed an even spread of both male and female individuals shortlisted in each category.

What advice would you give young people, particularly young women, looking to join your profession?
I believe it’s really difficult to know exactly what you want to do for the rest of your life at such a young age. When I was 18, I studied counselling at university for a year before I realised it was completely the wrong profession for me. My advice would be to try different lines of work before settling with the one you truly enjoy, and I would highly recommend a profession in the construction industry. Going to college to do a HNC in construction would help young people to decide which area within construction they are most interested in, and once they have decided which area I would recommend applying for an apprenticeship within a construction company. Apprenticeships are brilliant for gaining experience while learning alongside a job, in this sector companies look at experience more than education in this sector therefore any experience gives an advantage over other candidates.

 Finally, where do you see yourself in 5-years time?
I will have graduated and I expect to still be working within the estimating department for Seymour.

Originally featured in the Student Engineer 24th July 2017.