Seymour Civil Engineering completes work on the Skelton Townscape Project

 

An initiative being undertaken by Seymour Civil Engineering in collaboration with Skelton Villages Civic Pride, Redcar & Cleveland Council and funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund has been completed in Skelton.

The project hopes to restore the town’s historical heritage and looks to improve already developed areas such as public roads and pathways, as well as public spaces in order to attract more visitors to the village.

The first visible works by Seymour began on the 30th May and included new landscaping at either end of the High Street and the area known as ‘The Hills’ as well as a mosaic to commemorate Skelton’s history being developed by local artists and school students. Part of the project will also involve the investigation of the site of a medieval settlement on the edge of Skelton.

Karl Brennan, Bid Coordinator at Seymour Civil Engineering, said: “As a local civil engineering contractor, we are delighted to be part of this scheme.

“Works were carried out to a timescale and within budget. We have engaged with local stakeholders to ensure that disruption is minimal and we will leave a legacy behind that will positively impact the local community.

“We always take a keen interest in promoting public work within towns and cities. By creating functional, aesthetic public spaces we provide a benefit to the local business and visitor economies which also contributes to the wider Tees Valley Powerhouse plan”

Councillor Bob Norton, Cabinet member for Economic Growth at Redcar & Cleveland Borough Council, said: “This is a really exciting project and I would like to pay tribute to the work that Skelton Villages Civic Pride, Seymour Civil Engineering, Skelton Parish Council, the Skelton and Gilling Estate, and the Heritage Lottery Fund have undertaken.

“Thanks also go to local councillors and our team at Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council have done an excellent job to make this vision a reality.

“Their hard work has paid off and I hope this have a positive impact on the economy of Skelton for years to come.”

The next phase of the project is due to begin in early 2018. Consultations for works to buildings began in December 2016 with the tender process beginning in the autumn. The works include shop front replacements to 32 retail properties in the town and one residential property with window replacements being undertaken for all.

VIDEO: Yorwaste’s new £3m waste transfer station

 

A new £3 million waste transfer station has been open officially opened on the outskirts of York.

The waste transfer station, built by Yorwaste at its Harewood Whin facility, will handle 75,000 tonnes of waste each year. The waste will come from households in the City of York and Selby District Council areas, as well as Yorwaste’s commercial customers in North Yorkshire.

Waste that comes into the station will be sorted and bulked by Yorwaste before being taken for final disposal at the new Allerton Waste Recovery Park (AWRP), which is due to start accepting waste in August. The waste at AWRP, which is just off the A1 at Knaresborough, will be recovered into renewable energy.

Speaking at the official opening of the transfer station, Steve Barker, Managing Director of Yorwaste, said: “With the opening of Allerton Waste Recovery Park, it was essential to have a facility nearby where waste can be sorted and bulked before it goes for final disposal and recovery.

“We are therefore delighted that the waste transfer station, which is the best of its kind in the country, has opened on schedule, just as Allerton Park becomes fully operational.

“It means our local authority and commercial customers will have access to a state-of-the-art facility which, because of its location, will provide greater value for money and help them meet their environmental responsibilities through landfill diversion and more recycling and recovery of waste.

“This facility could not have been built without the support of so many people and organisations and these include the local community, City of York Council, our architects Vincent and Gorbing and contractor Seymour Civil Engineering. We would like to thank everyone for this support.

“These are very exciting times for Yorwaste as we continue to expand and cement our position as the leading waste management company in North Yorkshire.

“The completion of the waste transfer station takes our investment to over £10 million in the last few months, after we also took over management of North Yorkshire County Council’s household waste recycling centres and acquired Todd Waste Management.”

Kevin Byrne, Managing Director of Seymour Civil Engineering, said: “The project had several constraints, including time and working alongside an operational facility, but it has been very successful and we look forward to the opportunity to work together with Yorwaste again in the future.”

The Lord Mayor of York, Councillor Barbara Boyce, pressed the button which opened the doors to the transfer station, enabling the first waste collection vehicle to enter to deposit waste.

Councillor Boyce said: “I have followed the building of this facility with interest and it’s fantastic to be part of something which will help to recycle and recover even more of York’s waste.”

Ella Foord speaks to the Student Engineer about learning on the job

Ella Foord

 

Seymour Civil Engineering is a Hartlepool-based contractor taking a pro-active approach to developing a workforce with the skills it needs to take the business forward.

The company has spoken out about the importance of working closely with degree students to combat a growing shortage of skilled workers, one of whom is being helped into her career with a mixture of classroom and on-the-job training.

She is 27-year-old Ella Foord, a Trainee Estimator who is undertaking a Quantity Surveying (Bsc) degree at Northumbria University, entering her third year in September 2017.

As The Student Engineer has found out, Ella’s many experiences include a year studying counselling, keeping the cows fed on the farm where she lives, and building the A19!

What position did you apply for when you joined Seymour aged 24?
Originally I applied for a trainee quantity surveyor position however in February 2014 the company gave me a call to invite me for another interview for a trainer estimator. I was then offered this position in June 2014.

Can you tell The Student Engineer what you were up to before you joined Seymour?
My previous position before coming to Seymour was a buyer for Eldwick Ltd, a small groundworks company based in the North Yorkshire Moors. This was my first experience within the construction industry, and I am still grateful of Eldwick Ltd for introducing me into the profession. The buyer role mainly focused on obtaining the materials and subcontractors for around seven housing sites and also a few commercial sites. I started in this position when I was 21, therefore had three years’ experience within the buying role. Within this time I learnt essential skills such as taking off drawings and gaining knowledge on what materials are needed for certain operations which helped me within the estimating role.

Three years on, what’s been the best project you’ve worked on and why?
The best project I have worked on has been the A19 improvement at the Silverlink junction in Newcastle. It was a challenging project with it being based around a very busy road junction, therefore I had to think of all the implications of each operation on the traffic surrounding the works. Part of the drainage package was looking at shaft sinking and tunnelling underneath the existing road for the new drainage, which I found fascinating as it was such a complex process.

How is your time divided between Seymour and uni? Do you find that this is a good ratio and in what ways are your university experiences helping you at Seymour?
I work at Seymour four days a week and the other day I attend university during the term times. Then I work full time when university is between terms. I do find it hard to fit in both work and university together over the winter time as I also live on a farm. Winter is our busiest time of year on the farm as the cows are confined to the sheds, therefore need to be fed up, cleaned out and given help with birthing their calves! So I do feel like I am juggling my work/life balance when it comes to winter time, but I’m sure it will all be worth the effort once I have graduated. I believe that the experiences from Seymour have helped me at university rather than the other way round, I can apply my knowledge I have gained from working at Seymour to help with my university work and provide real-life insight.

Seymour is funding your uni education. What criteria do you have to fulfil in order for them to do that
I have to pass all modules each year for Seymour to provide my fees for the next year. If I leave Seymour within two years of finishing my university course I have to pay back my fees to the company.

Have you found gender to be an issue in the workplace?
I don’t think my gender has ever been an issue as such, but I do feel that being a woman within the trade, you feel as though you have more to prove than men. Some people may still have a prejudice of women working within the engineering sector and you can sometimes feel belittled, but I would say these experiences are quite rare in this day and age. I recently attended the G4C awards where I was shortlisted for Higher Education Student of the Year in the North East. This was a massive achievement for me and to be nominated in a category where 3 out of 4 of those shortlisted were female really shows a shift in the industry. On top of this, I also noticed an even spread of both male and female individuals shortlisted in each category.

What advice would you give young people, particularly young women, looking to join your profession?
I believe it’s really difficult to know exactly what you want to do for the rest of your life at such a young age. When I was 18, I studied counselling at university for a year before I realised it was completely the wrong profession for me. My advice would be to try different lines of work before settling with the one you truly enjoy, and I would highly recommend a profession in the construction industry. Going to college to do a HNC in construction would help young people to decide which area within construction they are most interested in, and once they have decided which area I would recommend applying for an apprenticeship within a construction company. Apprenticeships are brilliant for gaining experience while learning alongside a job, in this sector companies look at experience more than education in this sector therefore any experience gives an advantage over other candidates.

 Finally, where do you see yourself in 5-years time?
I will have graduated and I expect to still be working within the estimating department for Seymour.

Originally featured in the Student Engineer 24th July 2017.

New £3 million waste transfer station for Yorwaste

Seymour’s Stuart Dickens at Andy Pennick and the opening of the Yorwaste facility

A new £3 million waste transfer station has been open officially opened on the outskirts of York.

The waste transfer station, built by Seymour Civil Engineering for Yorwaste at its Harewood Whin facility, will handle 75,000 tonnes of waste each year. The waste will come from households in the City of York and Selby District Council areas, as well as Yorwaste’s commercial customers in North Yorkshire.

Kevin Byrne, Managing Director of Seymour Civil Engineering, said: “The project had several constraints, including time and working alongside an operational facility, but it has been very successful and we look forward to the opportunity to work together with Yorwaste again in the future.”

To read more about the Yorwaste waste transfer station click here.