Seymour Civil Engineering celebrates run-away success at this years’ CECA North East Awards

Seymour Civil Engineering walked away triumphant, after winning four out of the five awards at this year’s prestigious North East Civil Engineering Contractors Association ceremony.

Award wins included Health and Safety Company of the Year and Training Company of the Year, as well as top honours for a project carried out in the company’s home town of Hartlepool.

The Project of the Year trophy was awarded to Seymour for its restoration of the Hartlepool Town Wall, in partnership with Hartlepool Council and The Environment Agency, a Grade 1 Listed structure which had been identified as having overtopping rates that posed a threat to public safety as well as a number properties being at risk from flooding.

Many properties in close proximity of the 14th century wall were at one time uninsurable. The flood defence improvement is now planned to provide up to 100 years’ protection and these properties now have the benefit of being able to gain valuable buildings insurance.

The company gained it’s second award for “going the extra mile” on the Hartlepool Town Wall project by opening up coastal frontage, improving access for pedestrians and blending seamlessly the original seawall and new setback wall. This award recognised the early contractor involvement and how Seymour went the extra mile where partnership working with Hartlepool Borough Council was key to the schemes success. The award also recognised the many community initiatives undertaken during the works including Christmas Tree planting, adapting programme of works to accommodate local community events and ‘wear it pink’ in aid of Cancer Research.

Seymour was, further awarded highly commended for its work on another flood alleviation scheme in partnership with Northumbrian Water, in the Brunton Park suburb of Newcastle, long a problem area due to surface and foul water interacting with the Ouseburn tributary of the Tyne.

Seymour completed its prizewinning sweep by winning both Health and Safety Company of the Year and Training Company of the Year.

Kevin Byrne, Managing Director of Seymour Civil Engineering, said: “It is with great satisfaction that we have been recognised as first in class in all the categories that we entered at this year’s CECA North East awards. The achievement is a culmination of years of hard work and professionalism. While we have won in each category previously we have never taken a clean sweep, full credit to the dedicated team at Seymour.”

The firm has recently started work on a £3.4 million regeneration of Church Street and Church Square in Hartlepool, working in partnership with Hartlepool Borough Council, The Tees Valley Combined Authority, The Heritage Lottery Fund, and Re-form Landscape.

Seymour Civil Engineering-sponsored Team Hartlepool celebrate success at the Bangkok International Rugby Sevens tournament

Team Hartlepool celebrate their success in this year’s Bangkok International Rugby Sevens

“A great success for Hartlepool rugby and the town.”

So said team manager John Bickerstaff after Seymour Civil Engineering-sponsored Hartlepool won the Shield final at the Bangkok International Rugby Sevens.

The town side, made up of players from five Hartlepool & District clubs, plus two guests from the management’s link up with Hong Kong rugby, beat Lao Nagas 19-5 to clinch silverware.

But John explained that the measure of success went beyond being able to hold a trophy aloft at the Patana International School in the Thai capital.

“Hartlepool came out to compete in a brilliant competition and we’ve come away with something,” he said.

“That’s what we intended to do and I’m thrilled that we did that.

“We were making a step into the unknown really in terms of the standard we were coming up against.

“Many of the teams here were either national sides or teams who play together all the time.

“And you had the Pacific Warriors who had two former All Blacks playing for them.

“Our lads played very well, which is testament to them as players, we had limited sevens experience and had never played together before as a side.

“We were also contending with the heat and humidity, something nearly all the other teams were accustomed to

“But credit to the players for the way they performed.

“With the exception of the second group game, against the Thailand Development side, we were in with a chance of winning every match.

“Hartlepool has come out to Bangkok and performed on the international field and it’s something the town can be proud of.

“It’s much more than that, the name Hartlepool is out there and in a good light, and that’s down to our sponsors, people like Seymours Civil Enginnering.

“They have backed not just us as a squad but Hartlepool itself on the international stage.”

Hartlepool opened and closed the competition with victories against Lao Nagas, the Laos national sqaud.

The last win saw the squad at their best, contending not only with intense heat and humidity but vibrant opponents, to take the Shield, 19-5.

Hartlepool conceded a first-half unconverted try but responded magnificently.

The town side’s leading tournament scorer set them on their way, Jack McCallum breaking from half-way to score under the posts with a scintillating burst.

Cameron Lithgo converted for a 7-5 lead and it was soon 14-5 as Liam Austwicke went over from close range with Lithgo again adding the extras.

There was more to come as McCallum, Alex Rochester and Adam Smith all combined before Bailey finished in the corner.

Hartlepool had finished day one third in Group A

After a 15-14 victory over Lao Nagas in the opening fixture, they were defeated 24-7 by All for One (Thailand’s national development team), before losing 12-0 in the decider for second place, to Kazakh side, Olymp.

In the knock-out phase, they conceded two very late tries to lose to Spanish side Wiss, 24-14, before an agonising 21-19 loss to Chulalongkorn University, when Liam Austwicke’s conversion attempt with the last kick of the game went narrowly wide.

However, Hartlepool finished on a high with that Shield success over Lao.

Image courtesy of Paul Lincoln

Image courtesy of Paul Lincoln

Seymour Civil Engineering celebrates continued growth with the appointment of board of directors

front left Adam Harker, back left Karl Brennan, centre Kevin Byrne, back right Simon Rodgers, and front right Stuart Dickens

Seymour Civil Engineering has taken further steps towards securing its future success, with the appointment of four new company directors.

 

All hailing from existing roles within the company, Adam Harker has been named as Contracts Director, Simon Rodgers as Commercial Director, Stuart Dickens as Construction Director and Karl Brennan as Pre-construction Director.

 

Karl, who has been with Seymour Civil Engineering for 13 years, previously as the company’s bid coordinator, said: “I’m delighted to have been appointed in this new position. It’s fantastic to have been rewarded for my commitment to the business. It’s also testament to one of Seymour’s key values, ‘A People Business’. Seymour is excellent at fostering an environment that provides opportunity.

 

“A major part of my new position as pre-construction director will be looking at how Seymour engages with clients and stakeholders and how those relationships develop throughout the lifecycle of a project.

 

“Seymour has always been a client focused contractor, and as a result will have been successfully trading for 40 years next year, but placing a continued importance on maintaining strong relationships, and promoting sustainable outcomes above short term gains, significantly contributes to a positive and robust future for the company.”

 

Adam added: “I feel honoured and privileged to be promoted to director. It’s coming up to 10 years that I have been with the company and throughout that time the firm has assisted me to develop and grow. It’s now my turn to help take the business forward.

 

“I see the appointment of a board of directors as a real statement of intent by our Managing Director Kevin Byrne. It shows his drive and determination to see Seymour grow and continue to establish itself as the leading multi-discipline civil engineering company in the North East. With the new directors in place I can only see the business going from strength to strength in the coming years.”

 

Speaking about the latest appointments, Managing Director Kevin Byrne, said:  “As Seymour approaches its 40th anniversary I felt this was the perfect time to undertake the re-structure and introduce the board of directors to assist with making the vision we have for the company a reality.

 

“I will be working closely with the new directors to identify both strengths and challenges within the business, allowing us to prioritise time and focus attention on the key areas.

 

“As a team I am confident we will be able to lay the foundations for Seymour’s sustainable and structured growth going forward.”

 

Based at Seymour House on Hartlepool Marina, Seymour Civil Engineering has enjoyed a successful year, securing and completing a number of major projects across the region.

 

Most recently the firm celebrated a landmark contract win securing civil and infrastructure work for the £18 million exhibition development at Beamish Museum.

 

The firm has recently started work on the £3.4 million regeneration of Church Street and Church Square in Hartlepool, working in partnership with Hartlepool Borough Council, The Tees Valley Combined Authority, The Heritage Lottery Fund, and Re-form Landscape.

 

Securing the future whilst remembering the past Seymour Civil Engineering helps Stanley remember its war time history

Mick Mair from Seymour Civil Engineering with Adrian Cantle-Jones from Durham County Council, representatives from The Environment Agency, The River Wears Trust, The Heritage Lottery Fund, Stanley Town Council, and local residents.

North East Civil Engineering company, Seymour Civil Engineering, has completed work on a town regeneration project that captures the history of its residents.

 

Due to issues with flooding across the South Moor Terraces in Stanley, Seymour Civil Engineering was called upon to install a sustainable urban drainage system, a natural approach to managing drainage and recycling water.

 

To do this, rain garden planters were fitted between the pavement, providing homes for five trees, each commemorating one year of fighting in the First World War.

 

Along with additional foliage, the trees, positioned along the length of Pine Street, act as markers within the Twizell Heritage Trail, a route which tells the story of South Moor’s origins shortly before the First World War and how the miners shaped the community. Each tree will be marked with a World War one battle insignia, remembering the hundreds of miners who lost their lives.

The project was funded by The Heritage Lottery Fund, Durham County Council, Stanley Town Council and The Environment Agency.

 

Keith Love, Site Manager at Seymour Civil Engineering, said: “As a company, we are really proud to have been a part of a project that has not only contributed to environmental improvement and flood alleviation, but has commemorated Stanley’s heritage.

 

“Seymour Civil Engineering does everything it can to make sure it builds positive relationships with the communities affected by the projects it undertakes.”

 

Before starting on the Pine Street project, the Seymour Civil Engineering team attended a meeting with the residents to discuss the up and coming work.

 

Keith added: “Through the community meeting, we established the importance of avoiding unnecessary road closures and ensuring 24-hour accessibility to the households of vulnerable and elderly residents. Without that meeting, we would have been none the wiser and the project would have likely caused a lot of problems and upset.”

 

The project also saw Seymour Civil Engineering refurbish the pathways with block paving, designed in the style of old fashioned film reel to commemorate the important role that local cinemas played in war time communications.

 

During both World Wars, the community surrounding Stanley depended upon the five cinemas in the area for updates from the frontline.

 

Seymour Civil Engineering is renowned for its commitment to giving back to the communities within which it works and the Pine Street project was no exception.

 

Keith added: “Seymour Civil Engineering is passionate about going above and beyond to ensure its presence is considered a benefit, and its work is well received.

 

“Just one example of this is the work we did at the Stanley Community Centre. Mid way through the project we were approached by the centre’s management committee, asking if we could help make the facilities more accessible to the large numbers of elderly residents who use it. We offered to install dropped kerbs around the site, as it was clear that the community centre was an important part of community life, as anything we could do to help out was no trouble.”

 

“It’s brilliant to know that we’re making a real difference to people’s lives. The adjustments we made to our schedule and the extra work we added, had no effect on the completion of the project, but the positive impact it had on the community was ten-fold.”

 

Adrian Cantle-Jones, the Durham County Council Project Manager, said: “South Moor residents are delighted with the wonderful improvements to Pine Street and the wider Twizzel Burn and South Moor Heritage Trail. The South Moor Partnership is looking forward to continuing the regeneration of the South Moor Terraces and Twizzel Burn Catchment”.

 

The Pine Street project is one of a number of community initiatives that Seymour Civil Engineering has completed. Starting this Autumn, the firm has been contracted to carry out the civil and infrastructure work for the Remaking Beamish project, an £18 million development at Beamish museum that will see the addition of more than 30 new exhibits including a 1950’s town.