Bridge over troubled waters

A crumbling rail bridge located in a town’s ‘best kept secret’ area can now continue to safely carry passengers to their destination. 

It’s an area renowned for its natural beauty – but for the very same reason expert engineers worked in challenging conditions to support the failing Victorian rail underbridge over Greatham Beck, on the outskirts of Hartlepool in the Tees Valley. 

A range of specialist organisations – including Seymour Civil Engineering and AmcoGiffen – came together to complete the project despite being its difficult tidal location and abundant wildlife including kingfisher, woodpeckers and owls. 

Chris Byrne, Contracts Manager for Seymour Civil Engineering, said: “The project has run for 12 weeks and was taken on in collaboration with our sister company AmcoGiffen, which had been contracted by its client Network Rail, to strengthen the Greatham Beck rail bridge. 

“The whole area is teeming with wildlife so we also worked with the Environment Agency to ensure its protection. 

“But despite dealing with the very intricate challenges we faced with tides and wildlife, we finished the project on time and to budget.” 

The underbridge is located between Billingham railway station and Seaton Carew railway station, but no travel was affected during the work, which included installing a steel ‘liner’ under the bridge, masonry repairs and repairing fractures.  

Nick Hill, Senior Project Manager at AmcoGiffen, explained more about the work required to support the structure. 

He said: “The arch structure had deteriorated to such an extent that it was necessary to carry out major works.   

“For this kind of structure it’s normal to line the arch with corrugated steel structure to effectively make the brick arch redundant. As the brick arch deteriorates over the years the steel liner will take more and more of the load. 

“The main challenge was working in an environmentally sensitive area requiring various consents, tidal fluctuations and water management. 

“The tidal conditions were challenging due to the large differences in level from low to high tide. At times of very high tide the water was able to flow over our dam, but the water drained back out when the tide receded allowing us to continue working.” 

An engineering team of around 20 worked on the project which took 12 weeks to complete, starting in mid July and completing at the end of October. 

Nick added: “The project was a very successful example of how teams wanting to work together and communicate well can deliver a high quality project to budget and programme.” 

For more information about Seymour Civil Engineering and its work visit http://www.seymourcec.co.uk

Heroic Hartlepool rugby team do sponsors Seymour proud

Heroic Hartlepool finished in an excellent third place on their second entry into the Bangkok International Rugby Sevens.

The united side, made up of players from four Hartlepool & District clubs, produced a superb effort in stifling heat in the Thai capital. Beating Spanish side, Wiss, 21-12 in the Bowl final to decide the third and fourth positions.

Hartlepool enjoyed a stunning opening day by winning all three games in Group B.

The squad, sponsored by Seymour Civil Engineering, Hart Biologicals and J&B Recycling scored 10 tries, all converted by Ryan Foreman, in victories over Almaty, from Kazakhstan, (21-7), Central Queensland Dingoes (28-14) and Thailand team All for One (21-7).

In Sunday’s International semi-final, the Michael Ainslie-coached team were pitched with Confrerie Occitan in a mouth-watering England v France confrontation.

Les Bleus made the brighter start, scoring two converted first-half tries.

Hartlepool hit back after the break when Foreman chipped ahead for skipper Brad Green to touch down wide out, but they could not find any more scores and went down 14-5, their first defeat of the 2018 competition.

That took them into the Bowl final, where, Wiss, sevens and beach rugby specialists awaited them.

Were Hartlepool disappointed to miss out on a main final showdown with the Pacific Barbarians? Of course, but despondent they were not as they produced a come-from-behind victory over their Spanish opponents, who were old friends from the 2017 tournament.

Friendship went out of the window from the first whistle as Wiss ran in a converted try in the opening minute to go 7-0 up.

Hartlepool attacked at all times but in trying to force things too much, they allowed Wiss the opportunity to counter-attack and only great covering work by Green prevented a possible 14-0 lead to open up.

But some powerful driving play by Aidan Jackson-Smith saw him knock Wiss players out off the way as though were skittles to feed Taz Pelser who scoreed the equalizing try with Foreman converting.

A massive take by Sean McCallum at the start of the second half led to a brilliant Hartlepool try with Peter Youll and Green handling before finding Callum Whitehead whose rampaging run took him all the way to the try-line. Foreman added the extra points and United’s lead was 14-7.

Hartlepool threatened a third try from the re-start, only for Wiss to intercept and run the full length of the Pattana field to score.

Thankfully, McCallum’s back-tracking meant the Spanish touched down wide out and the missed conversion meant Hartlepool kept their noses in front at 14-12.

The next score was going to be decisive and it was Hartlepool who got it, with the team attacking both sides of the posts before Foreman and Pelser combined for the marauding Maddison to charge over. Foreman’s conversion made it 21-12 and there was no way back for Wiss.

Team manager John Bickerstaff declared: “This was a fantastic effort from the entire squad throughout the whole tournament.

“To be returning home with the Bowl is a testament to the work put in and the rugby produced in incredibly hot conditions.

“The players deserve tremendous credit, but our thanks go to the sponsors who made it possible and it was great for Alby Pattison, who as tournament sponsor with Hart Biologicals, saw his team play with such passion and pride.”

Green was joined in the winning squad by Horden & Peterlee comrade McCallum, while West supplied Jackson-Smith, Maddison and Youll, with Shane Jeffrey from Boys Brigade Old Boys and Foreman, Aaron Jeffrey, Patrick O’Callaghan, Pelser and Whitehead from Rovers.

Hartlepool companies come together to support Bangkok Rugby Sevens

Courtesy of Michael Gant

 

Hartlepool’s United rugby team are ready to fly the flag again at a major overseas sporting spectacular – thanks to heavyweight businesses packing a sponsorship punch.

Hart Biologicals, J&B Recycling and Seymour Civil Engineering have scrummed down to back Hartlepool’s second crack at the Bangkok International Rugby Sevens.

The squad, made up of 11 players from four Hartlepool & District clubs, will compete in the International part of the event this weekend in the Thai capital.

Last year’s debut produced instant silverware with Hartlepool winning the Shield section after beating Lao Nagas 19-15.

The town’s entry into the Bangkok Sevens was the inspiration of the founder and managing director of Hart Biologicals, Alby Pattison MBE, whose internationally-renowned company are the principal sponsors of the entire tournament which is played on Saturday and Sunday.

Alby was at the Historic Quay earlier this month for the presentation of the 2018 strips to Hartlepool manager, John Bickerstaff, and coach, Michael Ainslie, along with Mark Penny, from J&B Recycling, and Kevin Byrne, from Seymour Civil Engineering.

“It is fantastic that Hartlepool is competing at such a high-profile tournament again,” said Bickerstaff.

“But we’re only able to compete on the international stage thanks to the support of Hart Biologicals, J&B Recycling and Seymour Civil Engineering.

“They have made the vision become a reality and we’re looking forward to going even better than we did in 2017.

“We’ve kept a core of players from last year and believe we have a well-balanced squad who can challenge this time.”

The Bangkok International Rugby Sevens is an amazing two-days of rugby and sporting fellowship.

Founded in 1995, the event features an international section, plus female, junior male, junior female and social divisions.

“There is something for everyone,” said Bickerstaff. “There are teams from Thailand, Kazakhstan, Spain and Laos in the international section.”

Horden & Peterlee’s Brad Green will skipper the team and he will be joined by club-mate, Sean McCallum, plus West Hartlepool players Aidan Jackson-Smith, Lee Maddison and Peter Youll, Shane Jeffrey from Boys Brigade Old Boys and Ryan Foreman, Aaron Jeffrey, Patrick O’Callaghan, Taz Pelser and Callum Whitehead from Hartlepool Rovers.

As well as the names of their sponsors on the colourful jerseys, there will also be the logo of Prostate Cancer UK. Bickerstaff explained that the squad were unanimous in wanting to raise money for the charity.

“The players felt strongly about supporting Prostate Cancer UK,” said John.

“Prostate Cancer UK are putting millions into research and promoting awareness and we felt in Movember, the month when so many people grow moustaches to raise money, that we can do our bit in Thailand.”

‘We must encourage the North East’s next generation of women to become engineers’

North East civil engineering firm, Seymour Civil Engineering, is calling upon women in the region to help close the ever-growing skills shortage within the region’s engineering sector.

 

With women only making up 11% of engineers in the UK and reports from the not-for-profit organisation Engineering UK showing that the engineering industry currently has an annual shortfall of at least 20,000, Seymour Civil Engineering is eager to encourage more women to consider a career in engineering.

 

Andrea Cartwright, Head of Training at Seymour Civil Engineering, said: “When it comes to the skills shortage within engineering, a lot of attention is focused on educating school leavers about the opportunities available within the sector. Yet we have a huge number of women in the region who are being overlooked as a potential answer to the skills crisis.

 

“The industries main concentration needs to be breaking down the stereotype of an engineer, changing the perception that a job in engineering means putting on PPE, heading out on a construction site and getting your hands dirty.

 

“There are so many opportunities within the sector that people just aren’t aware of, largely because the multi disciplines of engineering aren’t well promoted. Many women have no idea how and where their skills may fit, and are unaware of the training support available to get them in to a career in engineering.”

 

Seymour is currently financially supporting 13% of its workforce within further or higher education, and has strong relationships with a number of colleges and universities across the North East.

 

Melanie Kent, a Quantity Surveyor from Seymour Civil Engineering who is currently studying for a degree in Quantity Surveying at Northumbria University, feels that more must be done to educate women on the opportunities available to them within the sector.

 

She said: “I would love to see an increase of women in the sector, but a huge challenge for the industry is trying to break the stereo type, alter perception and increase confidence of working within a male dominated environment. I spend a lot of my time working on sites across the North East and attitudes toward women onsite today have completely changed from 10 years ago.

 

“As an industry we’ve worked hard to change how engineering sees women, now it’s time to change how women see engineering, by exposing them to the opportunities and informing them about the training available to get them there.

 

“Getting a degree was a lifelong goal but due to a range of circumstances it was something I had always had to defer. Starting a university course as a 26-year-old single mum, working full time, was a daunting prospect but thanks to the financial and professional support Seymour provided, I am in a position to thrive within my career.”

 

In its 40th anniversary year Seymour’s commitment to training and development has been formally recognised within the region. The company took home the Investment in Training award at the Hartlepool Business Awards and was given Highly Commended in the People and Development award at the Constructing Excellence Awards.

Laying the foundation for 40 successful years in business

The engineering and construction industries are no doubt one of the most challenging and economically volatile sectors in the UK. Whether that’s in plugging the skills-gap, forward-planning in-line of government measures or guaranteeing regular work and future contacts. 

 This year, industry stalwart Seymour Civil Engineering celebrates its 40th anniversary and its journey from a local provider to a national award-winning contractor. To find out what has led to the company’s milestone achievement, Managing Director Kevin Byrne outlines the growth of the organisation and its legacy. 

 I am incredibly proud of the business’ evolution and its achievements since its humble beginnings back in 1978. I could never have imagined back when I joined the business, the projects, contracts, opportunities and dedicated internal team that we have created. 

 As a company, there are a number of values that we stick by and the first has to be our people. Our clients, suppliers and industry partners come into contact with our teams daily and therefore employee happiness and well-being at work is a top priority, as well as their continual development and growth within the business. 

 We firmly believe in home grown talent and currently we’re supporting 13% of our workforce through higher education, we have a thriving trainee and apprenticeship scheme which supports young engineers in to the industry, and the CPD and upskilling of all employees is considered a priority not a luxury. 

 However, our people would have nothing to do if it wasn’t for our second value, making sure we’re in demand by being the contractor of choice. We have team members dedicated to ensuring we are versatile and fitting to what our clients are looking for. The phrase ‘don’t put your eggs in one basket’ may sound cliché but it’s vital as a contractor to make sure we are continually developing, adding to our services (if it’s a viable and in demand business option), adjusting to market fluctuations and being open to taking on a multitude of projects. 

 From flood alleviation, to urban regeneration, historic restoration and transport infrastructure, Seymour Civil Engineering has done it all, working on large scale projects such as ‘Remaking Beamish’ at Beamish Open Air Museum in County Durham, providing the civil and infrastructure work for the £18million expansion, and the A19/A1058 improvement scheme in North Tyneside, undertaking the highway drainage and combined kerb drainage as part of the £75m junction upgrade. 

 Take the industry 4.0 and digital revolution, we’re now using digital to our advantage to improve in-house and on-site operations and improve clients and industry partners experience when working with us. Most recently we’ve developed from scratch an online portal to manage employee training and project staffing which can be easily accessed from a phone or tablets. 40 years ago, there was no internet, so it is important to constantly embrace new technologies.   

 Repeat business and partnerships are crucial to us and therefore our work must have a proven high quality. In the last 12 months alone we’ve been awarded the Investment in Training Award at the Hartlepool Business Awards, and at the Constructing Excellence Awards, alongside receiving highly commended in the People Development category, we won the Health, Safety and Well-being Award. 

 Internal processes are also streamlined, our clients have single points of contact and as a self-delivering company, we ensure there is a short chain of command to the top. If there is a problem, it’s dealt with efficiently, confidently and whilst communicating with all parties involved. We want Seymour to be a brand of quality that clients are confident to work with again and again. 

 Last but never least is giving back. As a company, how can we expect to be successful if we don’t help those around us? As I mentioned earlier home-grown talent is very important to us so we support local educational schemes, appoint STEM ambassadors, regularly engage with schools and colleges, and attend industry taster events to educate young people on the benefits of a career in engineering. This year we were awarded the ICE’s Mike Gardiner Cup for commitment to the institute’s education programme, working to inspire the engineers of the future. 

 As exciting as the next few months will be for the Seymour, celebrating this incredible business milestone, my blueprint remains the same. Standing still is not an option for us and even though it is unlikely that I will still be with the company 40 years from now, everything I do is to ensure that Seymour is in it for the long game.

Hartlepool businesses join forces to support local hospice

Seymour Civil Engineering has pledged its support to Alice House Hospice’s Moonlight Memory Walk 2018, one of the charity’s most popular and well established events.

In partnership with hospice patron J&B Recycling, Seymour has co-sponsored the five mile night time walk which takes place on September 8. The route leaves Hartlepool College of Further Education at 10pm and is a circuit turning round at the halfway point at Seaton Carew Golf Club.

Mark Penny, Commercial Manager at J&B Recycling, said: “J&B is incredibly proud to be able to sponsor the Moonlight Memory Walk this year. The company has been a member of the hospice’s Guild of Patrons for a number of years now, working to support the work the hospice does in the local community, which also brings benefit to both our employees and customers.”

Seymour Civil Engineering’s Lisa Gooding added: “The work of the hospice touches the hearts of so many in Hartlepool and its surrounding areas, to be able to give back to the hospice means a great deal to Seymour. A number of Seymour employees have taken part in the walk in previous years and the event is always a really good night. We’re keen to help make this year the biggest and best yet.”

Both businesses are celebrating significant business milestones, with J&B celebrating its 20th anniversary and Seymour its 40th. The two organisations are long term supporters of local hospice care and over the years have helped with funding and resources for a variety of projects.

Greg Hildreth, a fundraiser at the Hospice said “we are delighted that Hospice patients and their families can benefit from the ongoing support of these very generous businesses. Both companies have been invaluable in funding the delivery of our care services. Support such as this offsets running costs of events and helps ensure that the money raised can go straight back into helping people in need. We hope that lots of people will join us for another memorable evening.”

Entrants to the Moonlight Memory Walk will receive pre-event refreshments as well as a fantastic warm up disco from Walter Barton of Deck One and there will also be a late supper provided on completion of the walk. To register, go to www.alicehousehospice.co.uk or call Janice on 01429 855536 to request a paper form.

Success for Seymour at the Constructing Excellence Awards 2018

 

“Winning so many awards against such strong competition, really puts Seymour and Hartlepool on the map for civil engineering excellence.”

 

The words of Seymour Civil Engineering’s Business Development Manager, Lisa Todd, in the wake of the company’s outstanding success at this year’s Constructing Excellence North East awards.

 

The team from Seymour, attended the glittering awards ceremony at Newcastle Marriott Gosforth Park and scooped four awards recognising both the company’s ethos and commitment to excellence, as well as its high-level projects.

 

The Hartlepool based civil engineering firm, alongside Highly Commended for both the People and Development award and SME of the Year, were crowned the winners of the Health, Safety and Well-being award, judged and presented by Northumbrian Water, and the Civils Project of the Year for its work on the Hartlepool Headland Town Wall in partnership with Hartlepool Borough Council.

 

Kevin Byrne, Managing Director of Seymour Civil Engineering, said: “The Constructing Excellence Awards is always a highlight on our calendar, and to be not only be recognised alongside some of the biggest construction and civil engineering firms in the region, but to receive highly commended and award wins in a number of categories is a real testament to how fantastic Seymour Civil Engineering is.

 

“In this our 40th year, to have our company and our projects recognised so highly makes me incredibly proud. I’m looking forward to taking our trophies back to the team and sharing our successes, as without our brilliant and committed staff Seymour wouldn’t be the firm it is today.”

 

Seymour, alongside Hartlepool Borough Council, has won multiple awards with the Headland Town Wall project. In 2017 the project won the ICE’s prestigious Robert Stephenson award for projects valued £0.5m-£4m. It was also named Project of the Year by the North East’s Civil Engineering Contractors Association.

 

The company is currently working as the lead contractor on another council partnered project, the £3.4m regeneration of Hartlepool’s Church Street and Church Square area.

 

Kevin added: “Recognising our 40th anniversary this year has been very important to us, and especially important when looking at the community surrounding us and how the work of Seymour is continuing to impact the town in which we work and recruit from.

 

“We complete work up and down the country, but there’s always something special in being awarded for a landmark project completed on our very own doorstep that will positively affect the town as a whole and also the people that work for us.

 

“We have a number of anniversary celebrations scheduled over the next few months and the awards have been the perfect way to kick-start the festivities.

 

“Here’s to the next 40 years.”

Seymour lays solid foundations for 40th year

Seymour Civil Engineering has kicked off its 40th anniversary celebrations in style after stealing the night at this year’s Hartlepool Business Awards.

 

The team, who attended the glittering awards ceremony at the Hartlepool Borough Hall, celebrated a double award win picking up the Investment in Training award, closely followed by the diamond of the night, being named the Overall Business of the Year.

 

Karl Brennan, Pre-Construction Director at the firm, said: “It was brilliant to win the Business of the Year Award at this year’s event, especially as it is a very special year for the firm. Seymour is a Hartlepool company, which is proud to have its roots in the town, and to win this award on our 40th anniversary year is an absolutely fantastic achievement.

 

“I am really proud to be a part of Seymour and was truly honoured to have been able to accept the trophy at the award event this year. I’m looking forward to taking it back to our head office in Hartlepool and sharing it with all the colleagues who have made Seymour what it is today and who have made winning possible.”

 

Over the past 12 months alone the Hartlepool based firm has carried out a diverse range of flagship projects, both within the town and across the wider North East and Yorkshire region.

 

Seymour is currently carrying out work on the revitalisation of Church Street and Church Square in Hartlepool on behalf of Hartlepool Borough Council, as well as finishing up the civil and infrastructure work at Beamish Open Air Museum, as part of its £18m expansion project.

 

Within the past year, a number of Seymour’s completed projects have been recognised for their high standards. Most recently, work carried out on the Hartlepool Headland town wall sea defences, in partnership with Hartlepool Council and the Environment Agency, was named Project of the Year by North East’s Civil Engineering Contractors Association.

 

The association also awarded the firm a further three awards, recognising its outstanding work in Health and Safety, Training, and Going the Extra Mile.

 

In addition, Seymour have nine shortlisting across 7 categories at the forthcoming Construction Excellence North East Awards 2018 which includes two shortlistings for Civil Project of the Year and SME of the Year.

 

Karl added: “We’re a business that doesn’t see standing still as an option. We have continuously reinvented ourselves, innovating in a number of different civil disciplines from drainage strategies and sea defences to urban regeneration schemes and historic restoration services.

 

“Recognising the 40th anniversary over the next few months is going to be really exciting and we have lots of celebrations planned. Yet we’re in it for the long game and our success doesn’t stop here. We are constantly looking at how we can make the next 40 years of Seymour a thriving success, pushing the business to the next level in every way possible.”

Seymour recognised for its commitment to inspiring the engineers of the future.

 

Seymour Civil Engineering’s passion for inspiring and nurturing future generations of civil engineers has been formally recognised, as the company was presented with the Mike Gardiner Cup at this year’s ICE North East annual dinner, for the second year running.

 

The Mike Gardiner Cup is an award presented to the company who has shown outstanding support of the Institute of Civil Engineers Education Programme, and has been proactive in engaging with the younger generations across the North East.

 

Kevin Byrne, Seymour’s Managing Director, who was presented with the cup at the ICE annual dinner at the end of April, said: “As a business we see the importance of inspiring the next generations to consider a career within the civil engineering industry and we are passionate about showcasing the industry to the engineers of the future in any way we can.

 

“It’s no secret that our industry is facing a pretty serious skills shortage, one that if not tackled will have a serious impact on the future of the civil engineering sector. Seymour has an apprenticeship programme that we’re incredibly proud of, that has supported young engineers into the business and has given them the grounds to really excel within the industry.

“In addition to this, we also recognise the importance of engaging with the engineers of the future as early as possible, to ensure that 13/14 year olds choosing their subjects at GCSE have all the information they need to consider a career within engineering.”

Over the past 12 months, Seymour has attended a number of interactive events across the North East, showcasing the ICE’s cable stayed bridge, an activity which gives school children the opportunity to have a go at building and dismantling a 13m span cable stayed bridge.

Kevin added: “Civil engineers design, build and maintain the world around us and make our day-to-day activities possible. Interactive activities like the cable stayed bridge reveal to younger students the impact that civil engineering has in our modern society.

“The bridge exercise has been even more impactful this year as for many of the children taking part in the activity, the construction of the Northern Spire, the cable-stayed bridge over the River Wear in Sunderland, is happening right on their doorsteps.”

As well as exhibiting at numerous events, Seymour has strong connections with a number of local schools and colleges, with employees acting as STEM ambassadors and CITB Construction ambassadors committing time and resources to attending career events, pushing the opportunities available within the engineering sector.

Taking home, the Mike Gardiner Cup has kicked started what the company hopes will be a successful awards season as it celebrates its 40th year anniversary.

Seymour Civil Engineering has made it down to the final in seven out of 14 categories, totalling nine shortlistings across all the categories, at the 2018 Construction Excellence North East awards, as well as being shortlisted in three categories, including Company of the Year, in this year’s Hartlepool Business Awards.

At the recent Civil Engineering Contractors Association North East awards, they swept the board winning Project of the Year, Going the Extra Mile Award, Health and Safety Company of the Year and Training Company of the Year.

Seymour Civil Engineering dominates industry awards

Seymour Civil Engineering has made it down to the final in seven out of 14 categories, totalling 9 shortlistings at the Construction Excellence North East (CENE) Awards 2018.

 

The firm, which this year celebrates its 40th year anniversary, has been shortlisted for the People Development award, the Health, Safety and Wellbeing award, and for SME of the Year, amongst others.

 

Kevin Byrne, Managing Director at Seymour Civil Engineering, said: “It really is a testament to the hard work that we have collectively undertaken and the diverse range of pioneering projects that we have been working on during the last 12 months across all areas of the business.

 

“This year we have grown and improved in every single department from our apprentices and training programmes to our brilliant team on the ground carrying out work across all our sites, and I’m incredibly happy that this has been recognised by the CENE body.”

 

In the wake of the company developing and launching its own digital training portal, Seymour has been shortlisted for the Innovation award. For its work on the Hartlepool Town Wall project, completed in partnership with Hartlepool Borough Council, the company has also been shortlisted for the Preservation and Rejuvenation award.

 

Seymour are incredibly proud to have two projects shortlisted in both the Integration & Collaborative Working Award and The Civils Project of the Year categories, which include the already multiple award winning Hartlepool Headland Town Wall project and the Whitley Bay Northern Promenade Walk, completed in partnership with Kier North Tyneside.

 

The annual ceremony, which celebrates everything that the North East Built Environment has to be proud of, will be held at the Marriott in Gosforth, on the 14th June.

 

At the 2017 event Seymour was awarded highly commended in the Project of the Year category, for the Brunton Park flood alleviation scheme, which was completed in partnership with Northumbrian Water and the Environment Agency.

 

Kevin added: “The past 12 months have been fantastic for Seymour Civil Engineering. We have started work on a number of really exciting, wide ranging projects across a number of industries for public and private clients located right across the North East – further cementing our position as a leading independent civil engineering firm in the region.”

 

Over the past 12 months, Seymour has won a number of other prestigious awards in recognition of its hard work within the trade. Last year Seymour won four awards at the North East Civil Engineering Contractors Association (CECA) awards.

 

Sweeping the board, Seymour was named Health and Safety Company of the Year and Training Company of the Year, as well as taking home the Project of the Year and the ‘Going the Extra Mile’ awards, both for the work they carried out on the Hartlepool Town Wall project in partnership with Hartlepool Borough Council.